Archive for the ‘The Impact of Informatics on the Sociocultural Environment of Health Care’ Category

Medication Underuse, comment

June 7, 2013

It is so difficult, we want the medication that will make us better but then sometimes we can’t afford it.  It would be great if there was a way to utilize extra drug coverage if you needed it. Again, I think the answers are going to be found at the local level and also with creative healthcare informatics and pharmacology problem solving.

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Medication Underuse, comment

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Future Population Trends

June 6, 2013

With the baby boomer generation getting to the age of needed healthcare, it is our duty to take care of them. Having the technology that we have today helps a lot. We used to not be able to do certain things,and now with technology growing every single day, who knows what we will be able to do by the time I am at that age. With technology changing everyday so does everyones lives. We do not notice it that much because we are immuned to changes in the technology field. We believe change is a good thing in certain ways. This article is very informal and opens my mind to what we have to come still.

Healthcare Informatics Resources (2009, April 29) Future population trends [Blog Post] Retrieved from https://healthcare-informatics-resources.com/2009/04/24/future-population-trends/

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eHealth: benefits, challenges, and the impact on patients and providers

March 1, 2013

eHealth is the wide range of health care activities involving the electronic transfer of health-related information on the Internet and associated technologies. The use of technology in healthcare improves patient safety, reduces patient hospital visits, saves time of the healthcare professional, and supports individuals to look after themselves. Many studies have proven the vast benefits of eHealth technologies, but many organizations are slow to implement. This is partly due to inefficiencies within an organization’s infrastructure and lack of adequate resources. Implementing effective technologies is often difficult; keeping in mind the complexity revolving around the privacy and security concerns of healthcare consumers. Planning and performing needs assessments are critical and vital to successful outcomes. Although standards have been developed and implemented for formatting health data, organizations still face many issues when implementing interfaces between data systems. eHealth, with its intention of saving time and improving patient safety, still is challenged by the diversity of all consumers of healthcare. There are those who are information literate, with access to online resources, who take an active role in their healthcare. Additionally, there are those consumers who have no access to online information and no knowledge of how to obtain health information. This continues to be a need to promote equity in healthcare services and information access. Learning to access healthcare information will empower each and every healthcare consumer to take control of managing his or her personal health issues. With the known benefits of eHealth and the possibilities of managing one’s own healthcare data, consumers’ expectations of improved accessibility to their health information will drive organizations to enhance their implementation of eHealth technologies.

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Medication Underuse

May 3, 2012

Medical costs are exploding due to a lack of pricing regulation over the pharmaceutical industry. These high costs of medications are leading patients to seek other means of affordability. Choices that patients are forced into often lead to non-compliance medication regiment. We see the patient not taking their medication due to financial concerns. Some are choosing to skip dosages, cutting pills in half, to go with out food, with hold paying household bills, to not buying them at all so their spouse who is also on medication could buy theirs. This is not an error such as misreading an order, giving the wrong dose or ordering the wrong drug, however it has the same effect in that it is leading to a deterioration of the patient as a whole due to deviation from the plan. Some patients have turned to out of the country purchasing of medications, others to business that buy in gross, over the internet manufactures and some through local grocery store / pharmacy options. There are some warnings that have raised questions whether these medications are tainted, legally accepted by the FDA, are homeopathic substitutions to the prescribed medications which leads to concern and question of side effect they may cause. Resources with in the community and government system are generally available. Unfortunately they often require patients to undertake lengthy processes to get help. Outreach calls to patients usually help identify where social support is needed. Our goal is to aid in giving the patient the best resources so they can have the medication they need. As a nurse I feel we need to be an advocator, a communicator between physician and patient and an educator for the best care for the patient. This includes listening to our patients, hearing if they should choose not to take the treatment ordered and providing them with reasonable options.

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Is it Necessary to Document Your Efforts in Providing Culturally Competent Care?

January 5, 2012

Cultural competence has been a responsibility addressed in nursing programs since before I became a student and I have noticed a steadily increasing amount of focus placed on the topic throughout the years. As with all aspects of nursing, there will always be room for improvement in how we conduct our profession in a culturally sensitive manner. It seems to be a basic understanding that any nurse be acutely aware of his or her own cultural beliefs, practices and biases. I also notice universal agreement that health care professionals need to attempt to learn about all clients’ cultural attitudes towards healthcare and allow for specific integration of these attitudes when at all possible. As this is a responsibility of the health care professional, is documentation of the practice necessary as well? Cultural competence can be applied in all aspects of nursing care; so documenting the practice is very complicated. Much discussion will be needed to determine how it can be applied to daily documentation without taking excessive time from other nursing responsibilities. A basic need of clients is to have their healthcare options given to them in their first language to maximize the potential for full understanding. Hospitals have addressed this need in a variety of ways including written translation of informed consent and having native speaking interpreters present during any medical explanation before “informed consent” is given. The practice of providing culturally sensitive care is then “documented” by the presence of the signed translated copy of the consent or the presence of the interpreter’s signature on the English version of the consent. The cost to health care providers in both the areas of finance and time is great to accommodate these needs. Therefore, the value of our current practice should be continuously evaluated in order to assure we meet the needs of the client without excessive cost. Value is the key word in this sentence. In the case of the written translated consent form, I have seen consents get signed without being read and this has forced me to think about the various reasons this might occur. Could the client read the consent? Although the consent was in the language self-identified by the client, was the terminology not familiar to the client? Were the opinion and “desires” of the healthcare professional deemed sufficient and therefore explanation not required? The signed consent, however, is placed in the client’s chart and acts as documentation that the client was explained the procedure in a manner facilitating understanding. Healthcare facilities are also managing costs by trying to minimize the amount of paper used in documenting. I have seen consents presented to clients in the form of laptop computers with electronic writing devices. Does this technology intimidate the patient and further compromise their comfort during their healthcare experience? I am sure the answers to the questions posed above are as varied as are the cultures and people of those cultures seeking healthcare in this country. Is it really of value, then, to “document” all of our efforts in providing culturally competent care? Or rather, should we seek to create an environment in healthcare settings where continued education and discussion enhances the healthcare professional’s awareness of the need for culturally competent care? This in turn might increase our accountability to this responsibility without further straining the healthcare system with the financial and emotional stress of balancing the application of good care with the documentation of the process.

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Reduce our national debt by reducing the federal electronic medical records mandate, comment

July 21, 2011

Your post Reduce our national debt by reducing the federal electronic medical records mandate is right on target. The federal government and President Obama should not be mandating electronic medical records in the way they propose. The medical/nursing community and hospitals know what is best for themselves and their budgets.

I will add that hospitals should pull the reigns on electronic medical records. What I see is fierce competition between hospitals to draw patients. This competition occurred with CAT scans, MRIs, helicopter ports, etc. Just because one hospital in town has the latest item, does not mean the other hospitals in town should follow suit. Sure, time and saving lives are critical things to consider. The money spent could be used in providing some basic and needed items for rural hospitals. This includes providing the personnel needed for some of the rural hospitals. Our rural hospitals have a greater need than our city hospitals.

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July 11, 2011

Reduce our national debt by reducing the federal electronic medical records mandate

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Reduce our national debt by reducing the federal electronic medical records mandate

July 11, 2011

I agree that electronic medical records (EMR) that help to save lives, reduce paperwork, reduce expenses, and secure healthcare information. Larger vehicles like SUVs can also save lives and secure passengers. But, this does not mean that every family or business needs to trade in their fuel efficient smaller cars for larger SUVs. This is more true when these families and businesses are struggling during this economic recession (or depression).

Our government can save money by not currently dealing with the EMR mandate, by not tying up our court system with this mandate and letting our hospitals spend this money within their communities (meaning the government does not have to put extra money into these communities).

President Obama, this is one way of reducing your stress, the legislators’ stress, the courts’ stress, and the stress of the American people. Relieve our nation of the current EMR mandate. Consider a revised and later mandate.

Thank you.

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Nursing And The Electronic Invasion

November 15, 2010

I started my medical career as a Care Attendant, then a Licensed Practical Nurse, and finally a Registered Nurse. Over this time I have worked in two different states and seen many changes in the continuing evolution of the nursing profession.

The most recent changes have been primarily within the way we record our care. Over the past few years electronic charting has overtaken more and more aspects of our daily routines, not only do we record each patients vital signs within the electronic record, we record whatever they eat and drink, each use of the ladies and gentleman’s room, and most stressful for nurses, the exact times we medicate. We are given an hour, half our prior and half hour after the scheduled time of a medication to administer it. That doesn’t sound hard to do, but when staffing is short a nurse or a nurse assistant, more is expected to be done by each nurse on the floor. It is not always possible to adhere to this tight timeline, and all the time in the back of your mind you know that each day a printout is generated and sent to each nurse manager showing who was late with their medications, and each floor is sent a monthly record that is hung in the medication room showing each floor within the hospital and the percentage of times medications are administered on time, and when they are late.

We find that our computers on wheels are never more than a fingertip away, and the information that we put within the electronic record is growing with each passing day. It is an electronic strangle hold that has the floor nurse’s attention rather than the patient having the attention.


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