Archive for the ‘Patient Education’ Category

Patient Education Essential to Recovery, comment

June 6, 2013

My comment regarding patient education essential to recovery is I believe patient education is very important but I do not agree that it is all up to the nurses. The nurses should be educating the patients on things that are necessary but I do not believe it is their job to educate on everything. For instance speech therapists or occupational therapists are educated on certain things more then a nurse is and can provide more information and education on certain problems. I believe the nurse and doctor is the primary nurse educator but do not believe it is their primary job.

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Patient Education Essential to Recovery

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Impact of Technology on the Teacher and the Learner

June 18, 2012

The section on The Impact of Technology on the Teacher and the Learner has two very interesting points. The idea of encouraging our patients to use technology to seek information and educating them on how to find valid information is great. I have been in the situation where the patient has accessed information on their own and I helped them filter through details, however I had not considered encouraging patient’s to go on the internet to help
better inform themselves. I recently had this discussion with a preceptor of mine and she does encourage her patient’s to use the internet. She does specify to her patients to us either WebMD or E-medicine to help avoid them finding misleading information. I had never thought of encouraging my patients to access the internet, but I have seen the benefits on educating on valid web sites and empowering the patient to research their new diagnosis. This will
become part of my patient education.

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Whitney Houston Cause of Death, comment

April 3, 2012

RE: Whitney Houston Cause of Death

May I point out an observation and some healthcare statistics. It is a known fact that women receive less care and treatment than men for the same coronary artery diseases. As this fact becomes more well known, hopefully women will receive the proper treatment they deserve.

Women must seek heart care and treatment. They must not think that heart problems only occur in men. They must not push themselves into becoming ill as the men.

Whitney Houston, we miss you. May you rest in peace.

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Patient Education Essential to Recovery

August 17, 2011

The nurse’s role in patient education cannot be more important. From the time a patient is admitted until the time they are discharged, the nurse caring for each patient need to be teaching 24/7. Having a patient educator is a waste of money in my opinion. This is one of the roles of the nurse. He/she should be constantly teaching their patient. The nurses are the ones taking care of the patient and know exactly what each patient needs. When a situation or opportunity arises, nurses need to take full advantage of it. Computer documentation can help track what has been taught. We all know that the patients need to hear this information multiple times in order to fully comprehend it. Patients are discharged quickly from the hospitals these days. Nurses need to take patient education to the next level by evaluating their teaching. Just telling or showing a patient something isn’t enough. Have the patient return demonstrate or verbalize what they now understand. Patient education is an integral part of nursing care and one of the most important things we do for our patients.

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Not all Education is Created Equal, comment

August 6, 2010
Review of Health Assessment for Nursing Practice / Edition 4 by Wilson and Giddens.
Modern health care is indeed a fusion of technology and patient education. The use of computer based education is not only cost effective, but also offers an alternative teaching method to reading, demonstration, or verbal explanation. My concern, however, is that because of its ease, computer based teaching could be used as an inappropriate substitute for traditional nurse-patient teaching.
In chapter two we learn about ethnic and cultural considerations. Based on the needs of the patient or family requiring the education, isolating them to using media as their source of education could impede their ability to take home important, possibly even life saving information. Language, age, and preferred learning style are only a few examples that could potentially be enormous barriers in patient teaching if not properly assessed.
While I agree that in certain situations media can be used as a teaching tool, it is imperative that it be used appropriately and not be seen as an easy replacement for one-on-one teaching. Instead, media could be used to enhance learning in conjunction with personal instruction. This allows the patient to learn while also having the ability to ask questions and clarify concerns. The assessment of the nurse is of the utmost importance when providing education to a patient, family, or community.
Original Post
April 12, 2010
Title: Computer-based Patient-education Program

Given the enormous financial strains on the health care system, and the time constraints of health care providers institutions are seeking to find innovative and cost effective ways of reducing tasks like patient education.  Leading health care centers, many dealing with cancer patients such as Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, have taken the first steps by using computer-based learning tools.  They have documented initial success in implementing an extensive computer-based education program. Their program consists of a CD-ROM education program, an internal interactive intranet site that contains education about cancer, has library resources, and Internet links, etc. for patients to access.

The advantages are significant and health institutions everywhere are becoming involved with alternate methods of providing and reinforcing patient education.  Obvious advantages include the quality and consistency of the information provided to the patient, the ability to access education and information independently; provide training in the language of the patient, as well cost savings to the institution.  Disadvantages are the readiness and literacy of the learner, and the inability to interact with the patient at the time questions arise. Some would argue that the disadvantages are fewer than we currently experience, given the lack of caregiver time and consistency and quality of information imparted.

There is no doubt that we will continue to move forward with computer assisted patient education in much the same way as we have with our staff development and training.  Our institution is small compared to the major centers utilizing this resource for patient education.  However, we too, have embraced the practice of CD-ROM and computer based education at our Cancer Center.  Though manned by staff trained to educate patients, we have a resource center with CD’s, interactive patient education videos and an entire resource library for the patients to access.  The union of technology and patient education is upon us and, for the most part, appears to be a win-win situation.  Our challenge, moving forward, will be to find ways to reach and capture all patients, regardless of their status.

Informatics In Improving the Outcome of Joint Replacement Surgery

July 26, 2010

Osteoarthritis, or degenerative joint disease, effects many people worldwide. It is characterized by degeneration of the articular cartilage, which no longer functions as a shock absorber in the joint. Generally, obesity, aging and wear and tear on the joint are the chief factors in developing this potentially crippling disease, which usually involves weight-bearing joints first. Arthroscopy and MRI are diagnostic, highly technological procedures often used for diagnosis of joint deterioration. What used to be classified as a crippling joint disease, osteoarthritis of a joint can often be relieved by joint replacement surgery, the hip and knee being the most frequently replaced. Prior to surgery, the nurse has the responsibility of educating the patient on both the procedure and recovery, including maintenance of the prosthetic joint. A vast array of information is available through in-hospital computer based programs and websites. Some hospitals have joint replacement “schools,” which provide up-to-date information to perspective patients. Labs will be drawn prior to surgery and nurses may have computerized access to them before the surgeon; the nurse must alert the physician to concerning values such as decreased hgb/hct or increased bleeding times. After surgery, the nurse is again concerned with the informatics available in the immediate post-op period and during the entire recovery process; which would again involve timely reporting to the physician abnormal lab values in CBC, CMP and bleeding times. Because information is readily available through computer access following most lab draws, the physician is able to act rapidly to correct potential or actual problems (i.e. blood transfusion, antibiotics, hold or increase anticoagulants, etc), therefore, improving patient outcome. As technology develops, surgical techniques improve in that many joint replacements are able to be performed with much smaller incisions than in the past. The desired patient outcome in joint replacement surgery is restoration of function without surgical complication. Through the use of technology in the pre-op, intra-op and post-op periods, including the many patient education materials available, nurses most definitely play a critical role in this process.

Patient Education Matters

May 5, 2010

In researching a request by our hospital staff for a new Coumadin video to be used for patient education, I came across and wonderful website.  It is Patient Education Matters and is found at http://patienteducationmatters.blogspot.com/  . This blog spot was developed to assist healthcare professionals in the development, sharing and use of patient education materials.  The format is a biweekly newsletter, to which I will now subscribe, is totally dedicated to matters of patient education.  Patient education topics and resources are featured with each publication with links to education materials.  In this week’s edition Warfarin or Coumadin is featured as a resource.

In the case of Coumadin education, Patient Education Matters have linked to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) where I found many Coumadin resources for patients and families.  “Your Guide to Coumadin/Warfarin Therapy” is a video available in both English and Spanish.  There were other education resources for patients available including a comprehensive patient handout.  These resources can be downloaded at no cost or in the case of the handout ordered as single copies free of cost. 

In addition to Coumadin education, Patient Education Matters has a topic index for a host of patient education topics.  Links are provided to the actual education source.  If the education topic needed is not listed they also have a Google search engine that searches across multiple patient education websites at once. 

Our organization is fortunate to have a video on demand education system for our patients.  However patient education such as is available from Patient Education Matters could be utilized in some of the outlying clinic areas or by patients once discharged to refresh knowledge. 

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Asthma Patient Education

May 5, 2010

In researching the Internet for asthma education, I came across an excellent patient education website located at http://www.asthmacure.com  that I wish to review.  I feel that it serves as a good example of what patient education can be.  A patient would need to have the ability to read and basic computer skills to utilize this education site independently.  Alternately portions of the material such as the movie could be used for children and non reading adults. 

The education begins with an overview of asthma; discussing what it is and the fundamental information one would need to understand the disease.  The next section contains a movie.  The graphics are colorful and the language easy to understand.  The movie would be suitable for children age 8 or older as well as adults.  The movie is a wonderful option for those patients who learn best visually or have limited reading skills.

The third section deals with understanding asthma’s warning signals.  To teach the concepts they use a colorful picture and concepts of a traffic light.

 The green light is described as Congrats! Stable Asthma zone; symptom free with PEFR > 80% of personal best.  There is a link explaining what PEFR is and how to measure it using a peak flow meter if the patient needs this information.

 The yellow light called the “caution zone”, discusses the signals and symptoms of asthma that indicate varying degrees of airway obstruction with a PEFR of 50-80.  The advice is to avoid triggers and to add medicines in effort to come back again in the green zone. 

The red light is the “crisis zone”.  Patients are encouraged not to delay medications and to seek medical care.  They discuss emergency signals that indicate urgent care needs.

The colorful pictures and analogy using a traffic signal, something most can relate to, as well easy to read language catch the learner’s attention while providing very valuable information.  This is an excellent example of patient education, useful to many.

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Computer based education programs

May 3, 2010

Computer based education for patients is a unique way to try and bridge the gap on health disparities.  Many patients are seen in a diverse population that are not understanding their medical care.  For example, the doctor enters the room quickly bolts out the diagnosis and a prescription for a new medication and leaves the room.  Often I have seen this happen and the patients are left confused.  I have even had a patient say, “I didn’t understand one word the doctor said”.  I inquired why he didn’t ask the doctor to repeat himself or explain in a different manner, but he didn’t have an answer.  Often times, nurses are incorporated in the education of a patient and discharge instructions.

When a patient comes from a different cultural background than the doctor or nurse, it may be more challenging to teach them.  Some cultures have a tremendous amount of respect towards doctors: to not interrupt, argue, say no, or challenge them.  Others simply nod and say yes to everything, come to learn they speak not one word of English.  There are many more challenges when it comes to varying cultures, but to be able to provide education in a language that suits the patient, with a representative from their country on the computer, taking into account their cultural needs would be an excellent tool.  If the patients are not ready to learn in the hospital setting, providing access  to the information online when they are home and feeling better would be another benefit to computer based education.

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Computer-based Patient-education Program

April 12, 2010

Given the enormous financial strains on the health care system, and the time constraints of health care providers institutions are seeking to find innovative and cost effective ways of reducing tasks like patient education.  Leading health care centers, many dealing with cancer patients such as Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, have taken the first steps by using computer-based learning tools.  They have documented initial success in implementing an extensive computer-based education program. Their program consists of a CD-ROM education program, an internal interactive intranet site that contains education about cancer, has library resources, and Internet links, etc. for patients to access. 

The advantages are significant and health institutions everywhere are becoming involved with alternate methods of providing and reinforcing patient education.  Obvious advantages include the quality and consistency of the information provided to the patient, the ability to access education and information independently; provide training in the language of the patient, as well cost savings to the institution.  Disadvantages are the readiness and literacy of the learner, and the inability to interact with the patient at the time questions arise. Some would argue that the disadvantages are fewer than we currently experience, given the lack of caregiver time and consistency and quality of information imparted.

There is no doubt that we will continue to move forward with computer assisted patient education in much the same way as we have with our staff development and training.  Our institution is small compared to the major centers utilizing this resource for patient education.  However, we too, have embraced the practice of CD-ROM and computer based education at our Cancer Center.  Though manned by staff trained to educate patients, we have a resource center with CD’s, interactive patient education videos and an entire resource library for the patients to access.  The union of technology and patient education is upon us and, for the most part, appears to be a win-win situation.  Our challenge, moving forward, will be to find ways to reach and capture all patients, regardless of their status.

Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Online Class

Patient Education & Counseling Online Class

Health Care Informatics Online Certificate Program

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