Archive for the ‘History & Future of Healthcare Informatics’ Category

Future Population Trends, comment

October 31, 2013

Healthcare Informatics Resources. (2013, April 29). Future Population Trends [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://healthcare-informatics-resources.com/2013/04/29/human-computer-interaction-hci/
My comment regarding Future Population Trends is, with the era of the baby boomers approaching, we need to make sure we are fully prepared and ready for their care. While we do have certain technologies that we can use to assist us, we need to make sure they have enough hands on care as well. My mother works for a nursing home often discusses the concern of whether or not there will be enough nurses and aids for the influx of patients. Nursing homes and other care clinics need to ensure that they are staffed enough to make sure our senior citizens are getting the best care that they can possibly get. Providers also need to make sure that their employees are being compensated for the work they are doing as well, as care taking can be a very challenging and demanding job.

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Future Population Trends

June 6, 2013

With the baby boomer generation getting to the age of needed healthcare, it is our duty to take care of them. Having the technology that we have today helps a lot. We used to not be able to do certain things,and now with technology growing every single day, who knows what we will be able to do by the time I am at that age. With technology changing everyday so does everyones lives. We do not notice it that much because we are immuned to changes in the technology field. We believe change is a good thing in certain ways. This article is very informal and opens my mind to what we have to come still.

Healthcare Informatics Resources (2009, April 29) Future population trends [Blog Post] Retrieved from https://healthcare-informatics-resources.com/2009/04/24/future-population-trends/

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Progress, Change, Future

January 22, 2012

The future of healthcare information systems and a career in healthcare informatics holds exciting opportunities for healthcare organizations. Many improvements will be made in current technologies available. Although the concept of the electronic medical record (EMR) has been around for quite some time, we are just starting to see some advances in the actual implementation of automating portions of the patient medical record. To get to a fully automated health record, where all aspects of the legal medical record communicate to all systems, seems like a daunting task and yet so exciting to be a part of during these times. A career as a healthcare informatics professional will continue to be a desired profession and will gain momentum in the value these professionals will bring to an organization. Identifying their roles and responsibilities will become unique to each organization’s needs. Because of the many abilities and knowledge of healthcare informatics professionals, one healthcare facility may utilize these professionals in a different way and environment than another facility. Perhaps if there is not a developed informatics department, these professionals may even have different reporting structures based on where the organization sees them contributing and fitting into the organizational chart for that particular facility. The healthcare informatics field of study will be fundamental to bridging the gap between Information Technology Departments, Administration, clinical staff, physicians, vendors, and end-users. These positions are knowledgeable in a vast amount of areas, such as: information literacy, human computer interaction, human factors, usability testing, project management, working as change agents, standardizing language, evidence-based healthcare, numerous types of computer software such as database systems and spreadsheets. One cannot argue the fact that these knowledgeable individuals have developed skills, which bring much value to an organization. If these positions are utilized, directed, and supported, they will be extremely beneficial within a healthcare facility. Implementing, supporting, and maintaining an EMR is progress for any organization. The power of progress is amazing and builds upon each generation’s knowledge. Suppose each new generation had to rediscover numerals or language or medicine. The world would see no progress. Each generation stands on the shoulders of the previous generation to reach higher. Therefore, change is the price we pay for progress, and the EMR will bring about change for healthcare organizations. Change itself is not progress; it is the price we pay for progress. We will see some of the most advanced technology and the quest for a fully developed electronic health record will begin to take hold. As generations replace older generations an environment of automation will be expected and accepted by healthcare consumers and healthcare providers.

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History, Just In Time Learning, Genomics, EHR, Future

July 21, 2009

The history of informatics is documented as far back as the 1800s. The evolution of informatics was driven by the need to communicate, to record and to manage information. Health care informatics is a fairly new field but the changes leading to its development have been global.

Health care informatics education is transforming also. The changes are driven by the technology that supports education, the professions involved, health care therapies, and outcomes-based research. The technology includes computers with very fast processors and the multitude of locations that computers are being placed; such as smart IV pumps and cardiac defibrillators. In addition, high speed network access has opened the door to immediate teaching and learning to take place.

There is a concept known as “just in time” learning. This concept refers to the technical vs. academic education and focuses on small bits of knowledge instead of studying a domain of knowledge. One of the questions is whether an individual can combine all the knowledge bits into a cohesive whole. Patricia Benner’s concept of Novice through Expert defines a novice nurse as one who collects too much information and cannot organize it. It would be curious to determine if traditional education leads to greater ability to process all the information; to critically think.

The majority of my informatics learning over the past 20 years has taken place as “just in time” learning. I always perceived that all the information should connect in some format and have struggled with it for a number of years. Trying to combine nursing concepts with technology was not easy. Returning to school, taking informatics courses and being involved in discussions has brought all the bits of information together. It has helped me connect all the dots.

A large impact on the education process for Informatics nurses has been distance learning. Not all colleges have an Informatics curriculum and not all people are living in areas that have easy access to higher education. Distance learning, computer based training, and discussion boards have all supported the education process for health care informatics.

The science of genomics will change the delivery and ethics of health care therapies. Genomics will allow for pharmaceuticals to be customized to the individual, such as cancer treatments. This technology will have a huge impact on the response and sensitivities to treatments. This technology comes at a cost and how will it be paid for?

In addition, the Electronic Health Record is an example of an information system that will be composed of large amounts of data and will be able to generate data for use by insurers, researchers, health care providers, etc. How the information is collated, stored, retrieved, and used has not been determined.

Englebardt and Nelson state that “Technology will pervade all aspects of health care”, p. 500. Technology already permeates so much of health care. Whether this is a future trend or just the conclusion of a current trend is to be determined. The point being, with all the advances in technology; the impact on concepts, practice, work flow, usability, budgets, etc. it is incredibly important to have health care informaticists educated now and for the future to implement the technologies, define the processes, research the needs, and answer the multitude of questions that technology presents to health care providers.

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Future Population Trends, comment

May 6, 2009

In regards to the post on the “robotic” physician’s assessment, I feel it is important to talk about bedside manner in physical assessment. Not only does the idea of a robot substituting for a trained MD (or advanced practice provider) raise the question of patient safety, but also how does this make the patient, especially the elderly patient, feel? I come across many elderly patients who complain about never seeing their doctor, but always seeing “the nurse” meaning the nurse practitioner. They feel less taken care of even though these providers are well capable. I can only imagine how they would take being cared for by a robot at times. Patients, elderly patients in particular, respond to assessment much better when they can have a sense of trust, and we can provide this in part by explaining our process of assessment. By telling them why we are doing what at whatever time we do it, they they can feel a sense of ease, knowing this is routine and what exactly we are assessing. They also can feel a sense of involvement in their health which is an incredibly important part of patient care. As an ICU nurse at a high end teaching hospital, i find that even the most controlling and hard to please patients and families are more at ease and feel a greater sense of trust when I teach them. When I explain exactly what I am assessing and why, what symptoms I may be looking for and informing them of test results when i receive them, they respond with a sense of gratitude, reduced stress, trust, and understanding. I feel these are key goals in patient care and they can be met well, in part, through the course of our physical assessment taught by Dr. Johnson.

Original Post:
April 28, 2009
There are many future trends which will begin affecting the way we treat our patients. One that has hit our rural area is use of a robotic computer to analyze stroke patients. Instead of the physician actually coming to the hospital immediately they are remotely brought in by use of the robot who stands in front of the patient and the doctor can have the patient squeeze the robots “hands” and receive a reading as to their strength, etc. There are positive and negative aspects to this. First the positive is that the patient can be assessed regardless of the doctor’s wheareabouts and receive some form of feedback instead of potentially having to wait until the end of the day. The negative that I feel is a real biggy is that how do you know this robot is working adequately? To me being an “old school” RN, there is NO subsitute for assessing your own patient. Even if a colleague of my would tell me that my patient looked good or that their pain level was in check I would go in myself to eyeball the patient. Also, you lose that personal touch with the patient. In my opinion I would be a little discouraged to be seen by a robot but my physician gets the big check. There will be many more technical trends to come about but we must always remember that there is no subsitute for on hands care of your patient both for your knowledge but also for their safety.

Original Post:
April 24, 2009
Describing three future population trends, and discussing the potential impact of those trends on the development of new health care informatics systems. Changes is society, technology and health care are three population trends that will effect the development of new health care systems. 1. Societal trends: With the average age of the aging population increasing and the decline in deaths and births, the elderly population will be using significantly more health care resources then the younger groups. This would mean the larger number of elderly and the health status of the elderly population will have a major impact on the health care industry. The changes in racial and ethnic demographics will also have an effect on the development of new health care systems. A huge challenge for the health care industry, as well as software and systems designers, is to recognize and accommodate the needs of an increasingly diverse population. Increased access to the Internet is providing increased access to health care information, including evidence of lifestyle changes with a positive impact on health. A future trend would be for the consumer to take responsibility for his/her own health care. 2. Technology trends: With the rapid advancement in technology and computing, the cost of computer hardware will be driven down. This will enable a larger segment of the community to purchase and use computers to obtain information over the Internet. It is forecast the level of dependency on computer use in our society will increase dramatically. 3. Health Care trends: The development of information technology will impact all aspects of health care. It will become easier and faster to collect, compile and share data internationally and locally in regards to treatments of community health care challenges such as HIV/AIDS. Increase education and access to information will empower both provider and consumers. The consumer will engage in shared decision making with their provider. The fast pace of introducing new technologies, will significantly increase the number of new technologies available such s minimal invasive surgeries, genetic mapping and the use of specialized microchips for individual therapies such as pumps, artificial blood and other body parts.

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Future Population Trends, comment

April 28, 2009

There are many future trends which will begin affecting the way we treat our patients. One that has hit our rural area is use of a robotic computer to analyze stroke patients. Instead of the physician actually coming to the hospital immediately they are remotely brought in by use of the robot who stands in front of the patient and the doctor can have the patient squeeze the robots “hands” and receive a reading as to their strength, etc. There are positive and negative aspects to this. First the positive is that the patient can be assessed regardless of the doctor’s wheareabouts and receive some form of feedback instead of potentially having to wait until the end of the day. The negative that I feel is a real biggy is that how do you know this robot is working adequately? To me being an “old school” RN, there is NO subsitute for assessing your own patient. Even if a colleague of my would tell me that my patient looked good or that their pain level was in check I would go in myself to eyeball the patient. Also, you lose that personal touch with the patient. In my opinion I would be a little discouraged to be seen by a robot but my physician gets the big check. There will be many more technical trends to come about but we must always remember that there is no subsitute for on hands care of your patient both for your knowledge but also for their safety.

Original Post:
April 24, 2009
Describing three future population trends, and discussing the potential impact of those trends on the development of new health care informatics systems. Changes is society, technology and health care are three population trends that will effect the development of new health care systems. 1. Societal trends: With the average age of the aging population increasing and the decline in deaths and births, the elderly population will be using significantly more health care resources then the younger groups. This would mean the larger number of elderly and the health status of the elderly population will have a major impact on the health care industry. The changes in racial and ethnic demographics will also have an effect on the development of new health care systems. A huge challenge for the health care industry, as well as software and systems designers, is to recognize and accommodate the needs of an increasingly diverse population. Increased access to the Internet is providing increased access to health care information, including evidence of lifestyle changes with a positive impact on health. A future trend would be for the consumer to take responsibility for his/her own health care. 2. Technology trends: With the rapid advancement in technology and computing, the cost of computer hardware will be driven down. This will enable a larger segment of the community to purchase and use computers to obtain information over the Internet. It is forecast the level of dependency on computer use in our society will increase dramatically. 3. Health Care trends: The development of information technology will impact all aspects of health care. It will become easier and faster to collect, compile and share data internationally and locally in regards to treatments of community health care challenges such as HIV/AIDS. Increase education and access to information will empower both provider and consumers. The consumer will engage in shared decision making with their provider. The fast pace of introducing new technologies, will significantly increase the number of new technologies available such s minimal invasive surgeries, genetic mapping and the use of specialized microchips for individual therapies such as pumps, artificial blood and other body parts.

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Future Population Trends

April 24, 2009

Describing three future population trends, and discussing the potential impact of those trends on the development of new health care informatics systems. Changes is society, technology and health care are three population trends that will effect the development of new health care systems. 1. Societal trends: With the average age of the aging population increasing and the decline in deaths and births, the elderly population will be using significantly more health care resources then the younger groups. This would mean the larger number of elderly and the health status of the elderly population will have a major impact on the health care industry. The changes in racial and ethnic demographics will also have an effect on the development of new health care systems. A huge challenge for the health care industry, as well as software and systems designers, is to recognize and accommodate the needs of an increasingly diverse population. Increased access to the Internet is providing increased access to health care information, including evidence of lifestyle changes with a positive impact on health. A future trend would be for the consumer to take responsibility for his/her own health care. 2. Technology trends: With the rapid advancement in technology and computing, the cost of computer hardware will be driven down. This will enable a larger segment of the community to purchase and use computers to obtain information over the Internet. It is forecast the level of dependency on computer use in our society will increase dramatically. 3. Health Care trends: The development of information technology will impact all aspects of health care. It will become easier and faster to collect, compile and share data internationally and locally in regards to treatments of community health care challenges such as HIV/AIDS. Increase education and access to information will empower both provider and consumers. The consumer will engage in shared decision making with their provider. The fast pace of introducing new technologies, will significantly increase the number of new technologies available such s minimal invasive surgeries, genetic mapping and the use of specialized microchips for individual therapies such as pumps, artificial blood and other body parts.

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