Archive for the ‘Foundations of Health Care Informatics’ Category

Data—Information

March 3, 2011

As defined, data are plain facts. When data are processed, organized, structured or presented in a given context so as to make them useful, this becomes information. Data themselves are fairly useless. But when these data are interpreted and processed to determine its true meaning, they become useful and can be called information. A database is a structured collection of individual data elements. A good database must contain the information needed to assist with solving an identified area of need. A database can be a powerful tool of information collection and allows discernment of that information. A well-structured database that allows for easy input by the end-user will enhance its use and increase the productivity of that end-user. Using a database provides an effective method to review and analyze data. This data can support decisions, provide solutions, and help with predicting outcomes. When identifying the requirements for a database, careful consideration should be given to the intended use of the data. Recognizing the current need and use of the data is important; however, recognizing the ongoing future need and use of the collection of data is ultimately what determines the worth and strength of the database. Databases capturing quality data can provide a foundation for future needs of an organization. Organizations have information everywhere. For example, sources of information are located in documents, spreadsheets, e-mails, presentations, and multiple databases. Proper management and integration of its data sources, will allow an organization to maximize the effective use of its information and truly harness the power of information.

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Foundations of Health Care Informatics

November 19, 2009

Overall I thought this Module 2 of Healthcare Informatics certificate program was a good next step from Module 1. And that it got a little more in depth with the topics presented. I am glad that I have continued in this program and look forward to Module 3.

Health Care Informatics online certificate program

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Clinical decision support systems

November 19, 2009

We discuss clinical decision support systems on a daily basis where I work. We discuss the pro’s and con’s of it. Some of the older providers do not like the idea because they do not want someone or something telling them how to practice medicine. I think it should be mandatory for all providers in our organization to take a class on clinical decision support and how it can benefit them. We work in a very litigious environment and in part most of our lawsuits stem from providers not being thorough enough. A good clinical decision support system would prompt them to ask certain questions or order certain test.

Healthcare Informatics Resources Attorney Lawyer Clinical Decision Support Systems

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Support Systems

November 19, 2009

In this assignment within my Health Care Informatics online certificate program, I learned about administrative decision support systems. My organization is in the process of purchasing a new EHR and there are so many factors that play a role in this. We need an EHR that does more than track patients visits. This assignment touched on the different types of decision support systems and what each system could be used for.

Health Care Informatics online certificate program

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Blum’s Model

November 19, 2009

I am glad that this Module 2 of Healthcare Informatics took up where Module 1 left off. There was a whole chapter (3) on databases in the first assignment. That was one of the topics that I wrote about in Module 1 that i wanted to learn more about. I also learned about the Blum model. No one has ever mentioned that model before.

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Web, Communication and Information Management, comment

October 26, 2009

Computer communication is here to stay and we must be cautious on not leaving behind the idea of human networking. Networking involves interaction, and when humans stop networking, the flow of communication and ideas slows to a trickle or just dams up altogether. My facility is currently undertaking the implementation of an Electronic Health Record (EHR) and the staff are beginning to see what a daunting project it really can be. We have three separate teams working under one administrator and it appears as if no one is coordinating the efforts of all 3 teams. Each team says one thing, then another happens and another team has to scramble. The implementation is costly, and not just in dollars. There is the "umbrella" or main team, a surgical services team and a pharmacy team. Just to show what is occurring, the pharmacy team has no idea of the workflow of the nursing team and vice versa. And we go live with eMAR in 2 weeks. And new issues crop up that no one can answer. And the conversations between the clinical people and the IT people can be interesting to say the least. Our teams are small and that may be one of the issues. For projects like this, all members of the teams should have an understanding of the projects each team is involved in. And one person should coordinate the team. In a perfect world……….

Original Post
October 7, 2009
Title: Web, Communication and Information Management
Review of Introduction to Computers for Healthcare Professionals, Fourth Edition, 2005/2006. Authors: Irene Joos, Nancy Whitman, Marjorie Smith, and Ramona Nelson. Within Dr. Johnson’s course.
I found a lot of the information in these chapters to be stuff that I already knew for the most part. Although I did learn the definition of the world wide web. I just thought that the web was the Internet. One of the activities at the end of chapter 9 did walk you through creating your own web page. I did not know how to do that. Chapter 12 did go over all the computer crimes and some of them I had never heard of either. The IT professionals at work only address the most common threats.

Health Care Informatics online certificate program

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Web, Communication and Information Management

October 7, 2009

Review of Introduction to Computers for Healthcare Professionals, Fourth Edition, 2005/2006. Authors: Irene Joos, Nancy Whitman, Marjorie Smith, and Ramona Nelson. Within Dr. Johnson’s course.
I found a lot of the information in these chapters to be stuff that I already knew for the most part. Although I did learn the definition of the world wide web. I just thought that the web was the Internet. One of the activities at the end of chapter 9 did walk you through creating your own web page. I did not know how to do that. Chapter 12 did go over all the computer crimes and some of them I had never heard of either. The IT professionals at work only address the most common threats.

Health Care Informatics online certificate program

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Introduction to Word Processing, Presentations, Spreadsheets and Databases

October 7, 2009

The most important part of this Unit for me was the database chapter. I learned the difference between hierarchical, network and relational database models. I had no idea there were different models. We use Access a little where I work but not a lot. I would like to learn more about creating databases. I feel this chapter gave me the basic knowledge; now I would like to expand on it in the near future.

Health Care Informatics online certificate program

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Literacy

October 7, 2009

I learned in Unit 1 that there is a difference between Computer Literacy and Information Literacy. I think of my self as being both computer and information literate (at least I thought). I learned a lot of the technical terms for operating systems, connectivity, secondary storage, and software applications. Now I can use the appropriate terms when I speak to the IT professionals at work.

Health Care Informatics online certificate program

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HEALTH CARE INFORMATICS – An Interdisciplinary Approach, review

June 16, 2009

A review of Health Care Informatics – An Interdisciplinary Approach – Englebardt, Nelson

Enclosed are topics from each chapter that were significant to me. I don’t know how well the graphics and colors transmit when pasted: HEALTH CARE INFORMATICS – An Interdisciplinary Approach Chapters 1-5 Chapter 1 focuses on Major Theories Supporting Health Care Informatics. Although several theories are listed in this chapter, I am defining information regarding the “diffusion of innovation theory.” This theory was developed by Everett Rogers to explain how individuals and communities respond to new ideas, practices, or objects in 1995. In addition, this theory is defined as, “the process by which an innovation is communicated through certain channels over time among members of a social system.” This theory provides a key role to health care informatics specialists as they assist others and organizations to maximize the benefits of automation with the technology. Five groups of classifications based on their response to change are defined as follows: 1) Innovators: the first 2.5% of the individuals within the system who are comfortable with uncertainty and above average in their understanding of complex technical concepts; 2) Early Adopters: the next 13.5% of individuals in the organization who are discreet with their adoption of the new change and are powerful because of their potential to be key leaders for the new idea. 3) Early Majority: the next 34% of individuals who are willing to adapt, but not to lead. 4) Late Majority: the next group of 34% that will eventually adapt to the new idea through peer pressure, but not because they agree with the idea. 5) Laggards: the final 16% of the individuals are resistant to change and come around because there is no other alternative. This theory and definition can be key to various areas of the health care continuum. Chapter 2 outlines, “Computer, Information, and Health Care Informatics Literacy.” The chapter identifies Health informatics literacy as, the study of how health data, information, knowledge, and wisdom are collected, stored, processed, communicated, and used to support the process of health care delivery to clients and for providers, administrators, and organizations involved in the health care delivery. I prefer the visual perspective of how health care intersects. HEALTHCARE INFORMATICS INFORMATION SCIENCE: WHAT IS IT? Chapter 3 “Understanding Databases” This chapter has a plethora of new terminology to grasp. I am going to focus on the anatomy (fields, records, tables). A database needs to be divided into the proper terms. First, a field is a vertical column in a database. It contains data that represent the same characteristic for all of the records. An example of a FIELD NAME or column heading could be Last Name. The horizontal data in the database represent records. In addition, the record contains the different pieces of data belonging to a given entity. The record is made up of a bunch of fields. A table consists of all the records. By structuring, the data in fields and records in a table makes it possible to manipulate and/or select records or fields based on specific data elements in the field. The following is an example created in Excel: ID NAME FIRST MIDT PROJ EXAM FINAL 123-43-3455 CARD SAM 65 70 67 67.3 124-77-8900 HITE HOE 87 75 90 84.6 123-87-8977 NUTCH JAME 85 90 95 90.5 123-56-7655 ROBB MIKE 85 80 90 85.5 127-89-6655 TWATE PAT 95 98 87 85.8 123-43-6677 WREN TOM 90 95 90 91.5 AVERAGES 84.5 84.66667 86.5 84.2 Chapter 4 “Supporting Administrative Decision Making” An important system term named within this chapter is decision support system. Decision support system (DSS) is defined as an interactive flexible, and adaptable computer-based information system (CBIS) that is specifically developed for supporting decision making related to the solution of a particular problem by utilizing data and easy user interface (UI) The components contain: User interface ; facilitates communication between the executive and the DSS ; Model manager ; accesses the collection of available models ; Model library ; includes a variety of statistical, graphical, financial, and “what if” models ; Databases ; provide clinical and financial data needed for decisions An important conclusion to DSS use in the decision-making process is to remember, DSSs are not immune to the environmental influences that influence the entire industry. In addition, with the growth in health care technology, it is very difficult to stay current with changes without a multidisciplinary support of team members within the organization. Chapter 5 “Supporting Clinical Decision Making” The processes and outcomes of care can be improved with optimal clinical decision-making. Clinical decision-making is invaluable at all levels of the health care system. A clinical decision support decision is an automatic DSS, which mimics the human decision-making and can facilitate clinical diagnostic process, promote the best of practices, assist with the development and adherence to guidelines, facilitate processes for improvement and prevention of errors. Clinical decision-making is the core to promote “best of practice.” This system characterization is valuable because it provides comprehensive examination of how humans make decisions. Other systems are outlined and defined, but this one was invaluable for me to remember and use.

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