Archive for the ‘Ethics’ Category

Giving and Withholding Our “Gifts”

October 15, 2015

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by Susan Gurney
5/04/2013 / Stewardship


Luke 6:38 “Give, and it will be given to you. A good measure, pressed down, shaken together and running over, will be poured into your lap.” NIV

How many times have you heard this part of Luke 6:38 used to encourage Christians to give generous tithes and offerings to the Lord? Once? Twice? A dozen times?! I know I’ve heard it many times, and I have even printed it in a Sunday worship folder as an offering thought. Indeed, many who practice generous giving to the Lord have testified to the truth of this verse.

As I recently re-read verse 38 within the context of Luke 6:27-38, I suddenly realized something. This verse is not just saying that if we give generously to God we are going to receive His blessings in return. And this verse is certainly not saying that if we give generously to God we will become materially rich, even though there are those out there that teach that misleading thought in their “theology of prosperity”. I would hazard a guess that Jesus may not have been talking about giving material wealth at all when He said the words in Luke 6:38. In fact, Jesus may well be talking here about “doing unto others, as we would have them do unto us” rather than about giving generous tithes and offerings. Given the even broader context of the references listed at the end of this article, I believe that Jesus is talking about “giving” love, blessings, prayer, generosity, goodness, forgiveness, and mercy in abundance to all–even to one’s enemies! Jesus is also talking about “withholding” violence, evil, judgment, and condemnation from all. In Micah 6:8, we are reminded that the only things God really requires of us is justice, mercy, and humbleness–not sacrificial offerings!

Josh Billings once said, “There is no revenge so complete as forgiveness.” Romans 12:20 talks about doing good to our enemy, and “in doing this, you will heap burning coals on his head.” Although in our eyes this may seem a cruel thing to do to someone, I once heard it explained that in Bible times this was a very generous and loving act. In a time when there was no electricity and no matches, you were really hurting if your fire went out. This was your only source of warmth and cooking. A person in this plight could only go to his neighbor and hope the neighbor would take pity on him by heaping a share of his live coals into the container carried on the needy one’s head!

We already know how to give good gifts to our friends and family members on Christmas, birthdays and other special occasions. However, the year around we don’t want to forget to give to all the gifts that really count–the gifts that God gives so freely to us (and that He wants back from us!)–love, blessing, generosity, goodness, forgiveness, kindness, mercy, justice, and so on. And we certainly don’t want to forget to withhold from all the negative “gifts” of judgment, condemnation, revenge, wrath, evil, and cursing! For, as the rest of Luke 6:38 says, “…with the measure you use, it will be measured to you.” (NIV)

What does God’s Word, the Bible, say about this?

Proverbs 3:27 “Do not withhold good from those who deserve it, when it is in your power to act.” NIV

Micah 6:8 “He has showed you, O man, what is good. And what does the Lord
require of you? To act justly and to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.”

Luke 6:36-38a “‘Be merciful, just as your Father is merciful. Do not judge, and you will not be judged. Do not condemn, and you will not be condemned. Forgive, and you will be forgiven. Give, and it will be given to you.'” NIV

Acts 20:35b “…we must help the weak, remembering the words the Lord Jesus himself said: ‘It is more blessed to give than to receive.'” NIV

Romans 12:19a20-21 “Do not take revenge, my friends, but leave room for God’s wrath. On the contrary: ‘If your enemy is hungry, feed him; if he is thirsty, give him something to drink. In doing this, you will heap burning coals on his head.’ Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.” NIV

Now read the following Bible passages in your favorite version of the Bible:

Proverbs 3:27-28
Micah 6:6-8
Matthew 7:9-12
Luke 6:27-38
Acts 20:33-35
Romans 12:14-21
James 3:134:12

Susan Gurney writes devotionals, poetry, short stories, memoirs, and nonfiction on family history, faith and nature. She has experience writing/editing church and family newsletters. Find Susan athttp://ssimonsgurney.christianblogsites.com/blog/ Copyright 2013 Susan Simons Gurney

Article Source: http://www.faithwriters.comCHRISTIAN WRITERS

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Child Abuse Reporting for Non-Nurses, comment

March 8, 2012

I read the article Child Abuse Reporting for Non-Nurses. Citizens should also know about missing children in their geographical area. Many abused and missing children are returned home by average citizens. Progression toward abuse and death is stopped.

When I see a child I believe is reported missing or abducted, my iPhone(r) is turned on. Comparison can then be made between the child in my presence and the one on the screen. Informatics has made it easy and quick to make the comparison. Sometimes an age progression picture is on my screen. This can make it difficult to be certain.

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Ethics, comment

November 18, 2010

As an emergency room nurse issues dealing with ethics occurs every day.  Doctors who prescribe pain medications through the ER to patients who are “frequent flyers” several times a week with various complaints are enablers.  We now can access a patients prescription history on line to see if multiple prescriptions are being written but doctors have to take the time to use it.  Reporting doctors to our director has helped but we have a long way to go.  This is very frustrating from a nursing stand point.

Original Post

December 28, 2009

Title: Ethics, comment

Review of Health Care Informatics, An Interdisciplinary Approach by Englebardt and Nelson.

Ethical dilemmas in the workplace can be a very difficult situation to deal with as a nurse. We are often put in the position to be the patient’s advocate and that can be a very tough place to be for the nurse. I, too, have been in a situation where my doctor made a decision on an occupational drug test that was clearly unethical. I had to go to our Medical Director to get advice and when he became involved, the original doctor became very upset. However, that being said, I did the right thing and the outcome was correct. It is very difficulty to make a decision to “go over the doctor’s head” but I was being ethical and I slept much better because I had done it. Unlike the previous poster, the doctor did not understand even after much discussion.

Original Post
May 18, 2009
Title: Ethics

https://healthcare-informatics-resources.com/2009/05/18/ethics/
Really enjoyed the chapter on ethics from my textbook in Dr. Johnson’s class; I was lucky enough to attend a 2 day seminar in Ottawa that was mostly focused on ethical dilemma’s in the workplace. We presented different scenario’s which were really useful for future guidance. Of particular interest was the Nurse-Doctor relationship; when to step out of bounds as a patient advocate. We are often faced with difficult decisions regarding treatment of our pts. Do we agree or disagree with what the Dr. has prescribed? In one case I knew if I followed through on the treatment plan that the pt. could suffer undue harm therefore I was left with no choice but to report the problem to a senior medical advisor. It caused an uncomfortable situation for the Dr., and myself however after much discussion he was able to understand I was only acting on behalf of the pt. The chapter really gave me some knowledge of how to handle these situations.

Financial Repercussions of Insufficient Client Charting

August 23, 2010

In an age of electronic records and an economic recession, the nurse must be diligent about thoroughly assessing the client using a head-to-toe format and charting all findings in detail. Medicaid/Medicare has really tightened their laws on what they will and will not reimburse. For example, if a patient is admitted to the hospital and the nurse fails to chart that the client had an already present pressure ulcer, Medicare will refuse to reimburse the hospital for fees, supplies, and procedures related to the treatment of that wound. However, if the pressure ulcer is charted as being present upon arrival, the hospital is not at fault and will be reimbursed fully. Another example, separate from charting, is when a patient is discharged from the hospital following a heart failure “tune-up” and is readmitted within 30 days. The hospital in penalized for the re-admission. The problem is that there are other factors that could cause the re-admission that is not the fault of the hospital or physicians. What if the patient is non-compliant with the prescribed medication regiment? Should the hospital be a fault? Also, we care for a high risk, end stage heart failure population, so is it fair that our stats must match up to a rural hospital that only cares for mild cases of heart failure and does not perform transplants?

I agree that our government has to be careful as to how dollars are spent, but perhaps there are better ways. As healthcare professionals our voices could be beneficial and therefore need to be heard, but unfortunately I am unsure as to how this is happens. Perhaps if all master degree programs for healthcare professionals also included a Public Health component, more people would know how to be a part of healthcare reform.

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Ethics, comment

December 28, 2009

Review of Health Care Informatics, An Interdisciplinary Approach by Englebardt and Nelson.

Ethical dilemmas in the workplace can be a very difficult situation to deal with as a nurse. We are often put in the position to be the patient’s advocate and that can be a very tough place to be for the nurse. I, too, have been in a situation where my doctor made a decision on an occupational drug test that was clearly unethical. I had to go to our Medical Director to get advice and when he became involved, the original doctor became very upset. However, that being said, I did the right thing and the outcome was correct. It is very difficulty to make a decision to "go over the doctor’s head" but I was being ethical and I slept much better because I had done it. Unlike the previous poster, the doctor did not understand even after much discussion.

Original Post
May 18, 2009
Title: Ethics
Really enjoyed the chapter on ethics from my textbook in Dr. Johnson’s class; I was lucky enough to attend a 2 day seminar in Ottawa that was mostly focused on ethical dilemma’s in the workplace. We presented different scenario’s which were really useful for future guidance. Of particular interest was the Nurse-Doctor relationship; when to step out of bounds as a patient advocate. We are often faced with difficult decisions regarding treatment of our pts. Do we agree or disagree with what the Dr. has prescribed? In one case I knew if I followed through on the treatment plan that the pt. could suffer undue harm therefore I was left with no choice but to report the problem to a senior medical advisor. It caused an uncomfortable situation for the Dr., and myself however after much discussion he was able to understand I was only acting on behalf of the pt. The chapter really gave me some knowledge of how to handle these situations.

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Ethics

May 18, 2009

Really enjoyed the chapter on ethics from my textbook in Dr. Johnson’s class; I was lucky enough to attend a 2 day seminar in Ottawa that was mostly focused on ethical dilemma’s in the workplace. We presented different scenario’s which were really useful for future guidance. Of particular interest was the Nurse-Doctor relationship; when to step out of bounds as a patient advocate. We are often faced with difficult decisions regarding treatment of our pts. Do we agree or disagree with what the Dr. has prescribed? In one case I knew if I followed through on the treatment plan that the pt. could suffer undue harm therefore I was left with no choice but to report the problem to a senior medical advisor. It caused an uncomfortable situation for the Dr., and myself however after much discussion he was able to understand I was only acting on behalf of the pt. The chapter really gave me some knowledge of how to handle these situations.

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