Archive for the ‘Computer Charting’ Category

Assessments and point of care charting, comment

May 3, 2010

Assessments and point of care charting Assessing the patients and directly inputting the information electronically can help with many things. Obtaining correct information, location, description, improving and worsening data can improve if we are able to input all the information at the patients bedside. I agree with the other writer about the COWS. I have never used one in a patients room. Working in Emergency, we often write things down on a piece of paper and use our memory for what is not jotted down. The only time it is fitting for us in Emergency to use a COW is during a Code where inputting the medications and procedures as they are being done saves a lot of time. If you simply write down each step on a piece of paper, then sit down to chart on the computer after it can take up to 20-30 minutes. Another idea instead of COWS or small hand held devices is to give each nurse her own laptop to use for the day and give it to the next shift as they come in. Lap tops are not too small or too big. Charting at the bedside for assessments and having the MAR on hand to check at bedside is helpful.

Original Post
March 1, 2010
Title: Assessments and point of care charting
I absolutely agree with all the comments presented in the below link. Being that computerized documentation is less than 6 months old in our main facility, bedside point of care charting is a relatively new concept. It used to be that the only documentation performed at the bedside was the patient database and even then, most of that information was gathered on initial assessment and we would then go out to the desk to complete the paperwork. I think as more organizations embrace technology, more thought needs to go into the purchasing of equipment. At our facility, the managers for each unit were given a budget to purchase the style of computer they thought would be best suited for that particular unit. Pods were designed with central computers, handheld devices were purchased as well as COWs (computer on wheels). Many units after the fact discovered that the COWS were too big to get to the second bed in the room. This caused non-compliance with The Joint Commission standard stating that the e-mar must be at the bedside when administering medications. Other units found the hand held devices to small to use – the type to difficult to read. Pods are great for the primary nursing concept but takes the nurse away from the bedside. Many areas discovered just how few available outlets they had how short a battery life really is. We even had to become politically correct when a patient complained to administration that she overheard a nurse in the ER referring to "that stupid COW that had died in the hallway" – not realizing the nurse was frustrated that no one had bothered to plug the computer in to charge. We now refer to COWS as WOWS – work stations on wheels. With all that aside, we are finding that wall based point of care computers work best allowing optimal contact with the patient while gathering crucial information to be utilized in their treatment of care – as long as the computer is not on a wall that forces your back to the patient the entire time you are typing!

Original Post
December 14, 2009
Title: Assessments and Point of Care Charting
Charting patient assessments is often a time consuming task, but vital to the care of the patient and record keeping. Nursing often jot notes down on a piece of paper, to only later record them into the computer system. Much may be lost in the translation. In addition, actions may be taken on the charting that in currently in the computer, though it may not always be the most current reflection of the patent’s status. Point of care systems have become paramount for charting in acute care settings, especially on critical care units. They often interface with medical devices to collect data automatically. These systems are often flowsheet orientated and provide graphing and trending capabilities. Optimally these systems create less redundancy, offer quick responses and interface with other clinical operations such as the laboratory and pharmacy departments. The computer availability is also an important consideration. Central computers have not always enhanced charting as they may take nurse from the bedside. Point of care charting should be convenient points of access to the system. Computers on Wheels (COWS) are found in many organizations. The portable, efficient system allows the nurse to chart in the patients room when appropriate. Bedside systems at the point of care focus on quickly capturing information that a nurse may otherwise jot down on their notes. Computer location should be given thoughtful consideration before investments are made in addition to the device’s speed and ease of use.

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Changes in Cardiac Care

January 4, 2010

It used to be that if your heart was “acting funny” you were put in the hospital on a monitor and stuck in one unit in the hospital. Different drugs were tried on you, and you had to stay directly on that unit while someone sat at a desk and tried to capture that “funny” activity on a strip of paper.

We now have technology that allows much more freedom, both for the patient while the heart trouble is being diagnosed, and in the treatments that are available.

Patients are no longer stuck on one unit in a hospital while staff try to catch and document the funny electrical activity. A patient wears a holter monitor that is recording the hearts activity for 24 hours or longer while they continue on with their normal activities of daily living.

If the electrical activity turns out to be a conduction problem, the patient can undergo ablation therapy. This involves putting wires into the heart and stimulating the different pathways of the heart until the one that is causing the interruption is identified. At that point the pathway is ablated, cutting off the pathway. This is all done using computers to analyze the data from the heart.

If the patient does end up in the hospital, the nurse is no longer tied to the desk if they want to watch the patient’s cardiac activity. A patient’s telemetry unit now can be transmitted to small computers that the nurse carries with her as she goes about doing her usual duties. At any time the nurse can check the patient’s status. The small computer will also notify the nurse if it identifies a rhythm that is unusual.

These advances not only help with patient management, but also increase the safety of patient care.

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Nursing Electronic Charting

December 8, 2009

The use of electronic charting has increased the accuracy and completeness of nursing documentation, eliminated redundancy, automated the collection and reuse of nursing data and facilitated the analysis of clinical data. The ability to quickly retrieve nursing data promotes decision-making at all levels of healthcare delivery. In addition, the use of electronic charting has provided consistency with the Joint Commission indicators, and federal or state mandated and facility specific data. The ability to effectively manage and communicate data using computer systems and telecommunications has catalyzed the emergence of the science of nursing informatics. With that being said, patient charting still requires substantial time to record the variety of complex care delivered to the patient. One would think that a nurse could quickly go in and check a few boxes and be done with it. However, that is not so. There may be several programs to access, multiple tabs to click and numerous entries to account for. Charting thoroughly on patient assessments, medications, treatments, teaching, changes in condition, physician contact, care plans, etc. can account for a significant amount of time. Though charting methods have improved remarkable over the years, it remains a vital, but incredibly complex and time consuming component of the delivery of patient care.

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Documentation on Bedsores, comment

October 26, 2009

Documentation of pressure ulcers MUST begin in the ED. With approximately 50% of admissions coming through the ER, this is an essential, albeit very difficult task that goes by without any thought. With all the patient types seen in the ED, it can be difficult to apply all the assessments to all patients. However, skin breakdown needs to become a priority and can be made a priority if performed appropriately and at the right time. ER nurses think in the NOW; what can be treated now, what med can be given now, what test can be performed now, who can be admitted now, who can be discharged now. In order to incorporate skin assessment into the ER nurses list of tasks, it can be added to the LATER list, but care needs to be taken to not forget this important step. Once the patient has been stabilized, the skin assessment can occur. With the advent of computer charting, this step can be made easier with drop-downs and body charts. Performing this valuable assessment will help decrease cost to the facility and cost to the patient as well as decrease the risk to a patient if they are identified early in the admission process.

Original Post
September 7, 2009
Title: Documentation on Bedsores, comment

Having worked in the NICU for many years, we see several issues with skin breakdown. For the micro-preemies who are lacking the epidermis (or extremely thin epidermis)- it is especially hard to not have skin breakdown, anything that potentially touches their skin will cause breakdown. All of these babies are considered critically ill therefore require several EKG leads, pulse oximetry probes and other transcutaneous monitors. These monitors should be repositioned every couple of hours to minimize the damage and burns. Documenting and notifying the physician of skin breakdown is EXTREMELY important with these patients as they are at such high risk for infections.

Original Post
August 20, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

This is very true about the documentation of bed sores being incorrect. In the ICU where I work at, we actually document initially if there are any sores as soon as the patient arrives. It is located in the admission assessment. After that it is up to the nurses top document if there have been any changes in the skin integrity of the patient. Multiple time we see a skin assessment documented with a stage one/two pressure ulcer when reality is that it is incontinence associated dermatitis. Most time the IAD can resolved by either timely cleansing of the person, the insertion of a rectal tube and foley catheter (if not previously present) and some type of barrier ointment. In a way prevention is the best medicine for IAD and Pressure Ulcers, in companied with good core and forensic assessment skills. If the pt is having large loose stools, create a prevention to keep the skin intact.

Original Post
August 3, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

The hospital where I currently work also includes documentation of existing pressure ulcers on admission of a patient. However, the protocol asks you to assess the patient’s skin then to document on paper what the ulcer looks like, stage, size, drainage, etc. The paper charting does not require a picture of the pressure ulcer that was found by assessment of the RN. I think this leaves a wide margin for error. It is probable that some ulcers will not be documented correctly. I believe that a photo would be advantageous to the medical record along with perhaps a computerized charting system where you can label with an X any area of the body that has breakdown and then attach a photograph to the document. Also the documentation I work with does not allow for updates on how the pressure ulcer heals or worsens. This also leaves room for criticism and error. I think my place of work would benefit from photo/computerized documentation of pressure ulcers.

Original Post:
July 31, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

I found this post and other comments relative to my new nursing job. As an experienced ER nurse, we found little time to assess or document pressure ulcers. With the new CMS guidelines that came out this past October, Medicare will not longer be reimbursing for facility acquired pressure ulcers. My new nursing role focuses on prevention and education. I was very surprised how little I knew about pressure ulcers from working in the ED. Yet it is so vital that our assessment starts there. The photo proof documentation mentioned in this Post sounds like an excellent idea. One of the hospitals I work with, just installed a whole new soft ware program for nursing documentation. It is really easy to chart your skin assessments and pressure ulcers. With drop down choices, body diagrams. But the wound care nurse still has to validate the floor nurses documentation with her own patient assessment every month. I helped her with this, and it was very time consuming. It was double the work in my eyes. Yet we did find, many pressure ulcers that were resolved and many that were staged incorrectly, as well as several that were missed by the RN. Even though we have many different technologies to help us with our documentation and assessment, it still comes down to basic education.

Original Post:
June 17, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores
Joint Commission and CMS (Medicare) has set a Patient Safety Goal of not allowing bedsores to occur during hospitalizations. My institution uses technology to document existing wounds at the time of admission assessment. We are a totally computerized charting hospital. When we identify an existing wound, we bring up a screen of the body and insert a photo of the wound into the patient’s medical record. This feature allows us to prevent lawsuits and receive the correct reimbursement of that patient’s hospitalization. Health assessment no longer has to rely on a verbal or hand written dictation to describe history and physical assessments!

Defense Lawyer Attorney decubitis pressure ulcer bedsore

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Bedsores treatment, comment

September 25, 2009

When it comes to bedsores, prevention is clearly worth more than any cure. Wheelchair-bound or bedridden people should shift their positions regularly. They should be bathed frequently and dried thoroughly, and their skin should be lubricated with a mild, non-irritating lotion. They should have clean, dry, tight-fitting, unstarched cotton sheets; loose-fitting clothes; plenty of air circulation; a healthy diet; and some sort of regular exercise – even if a caregiver has to move their limbs. To cushion sensitive areas, try an "eggcrate" foam mattress overlay, a water-filled mattress, or a sheepskin pad over the bedsheets. Consider a variable-pressure mattress with separate sections that can be inflated and deflated independently to adjust pressure on the patient’s body. A change in a patient’s condition demands immediate attention, some examples include, but are not limited to: (1) A person is going to remain bedridden or immobile for an extended period, cannot move or is very weak, and is beginning to develop bedsores. The person may need regular attendance by a nurse or other trained health-care provider. (2) The sore produces a discharge, which may contain pus or become foul smelling; or if the sore turns black. This indicates an infection or tissue death (Gangrene); get immediate medical attention.

Original Post
September 7, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

Having worked in the NICU for many years, we see several issues with skin breakdown. For the micro-preemies who are lacking the epidermis (or extremely thin epidermis)- it is especially hard to not have skin breakdown, anything that potentially touches their skin will cause breakdown. All of these babies are considered critically ill therefore require several EKG leads, pulse oximetry probes and other transcutaneous monitors. These monitors should be repositioned every couple of hours to minimize the damage and burns. Documenting and notifying the physician of skin breakdown is EXTREMELY important with these patients as they are at such high risk for infections.

Original Post
August 20, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

This is very true about the documentation of bed sores being incorrect. In the ICU where I work at, we actually document initially if there are any sores as soon as the patient arrives. It is located in the admission assessment. After that it is up to the nurses top document if there have been any changes in the skin integrity of the patient. Multiple time we see a skin assessment documented with a stage one/two pressure ulcer when reality is that it is incontinence associated dermatitis. Most time the IAD can resolved by either timely cleansing of the person, the insertion of a rectal tube and foley catheter (if not previously present) and some type of barrier ointment. In a way prevention is the best medicine for IAD and Pressure Ulcers, in companied with good core and forensic assessment skills. If the pt is having large loose stools, create a prevention to keep the skin intact.

Original Post
August 3, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

The hospital where I currently work also includes documentation of existing pressure ulcers on admission of a patient. However, the protocol asks you to assess the patient’s skin then to document on paper what the ulcer looks like, stage, size, drainage, etc. The paper charting does not require a picture of the pressure ulcer that was found by assessment of the RN. I think this leaves a wide margin for error. It is probable that some ulcers will not be documented correctly. I believe that a photo would be advantageous to the medical record along with perhaps a computerized charting system where you can label with an X any area of the body that has breakdown and then attach a photograph to the document. Also the documentation I work with does not allow for updates on how the pressure ulcer heals or worsens. This also leaves room for criticism and error. I think my place of work would benefit from photo/computerized documentation of pressure ulcers.

Original Post:
July 31, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

I found this post and other comments relative to my new nursing job. As an experienced ER nurse, we found little time to assess or document pressure ulcers. With the new CMS guidelines that came out this past October, Medicare will not longer be reimbursing for facility acquired pressure ulcers. My new nursing role focuses on prevention and education. I was very surprised how little I knew about pressure ulcers from working in the ED. Yet it is so vital that our assessment starts there. The photo proof documentation mentioned in this Post sounds like an excellent idea. One of the hospitals I work with, just installed a whole new soft ware program for nursing documentation. It is really easy to chart your skin assessments and pressure ulcers. With drop down choices, body diagrams. But the wound care nurse still has to validate the floor nurses documentation with her own patient assessment every month. I helped her with this, and it was very time consuming. It was double the work in my eyes. Yet we did find, many pressure ulcers that were resolved and many that were staged incorrectly, as well as several that were missed by the RN. Even though we have many different technologies to help us with our documentation and assessment, it still comes down to basic education.

Original Post:
June 17, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores
Joint Commission and CMS (Medicare) has set a Patient Safety Goal of not allowing bedsores to occur during hospitalizations. My institution uses technology to document existing wounds at the time of admission assessment. We are a totally computerized charting hospital. When we identify an existing wound, we bring up a screen of the body and insert a photo of the wound into the patient’s medical record. This feature allows us to prevent lawsuits and receive the correct reimbursement of that patient’s hospitalization. Health assessment no longer has to rely on a verbal or hand written dictation to describe history and physical assessments!

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Documentation on Bedsores, comment

September 15, 2009

When performing a skin assessment the obvious places to look for pressure ulcers are the sacrum, elbows, and heels. We can not forget to look in the unlikely places, such as the back of the head, ear lobes and around an ET tube. Doing many prevalence studies at numerous hospitals, I found many pressure ulcers that are missed or with improper documentation. I found that often fungal rashes, healed pressure ulcers, blanchable redness, and moisture related maceration are staged as a pressure ulcer. One hospital that recently changed to computer charting, has a system that can list all patients that were documented with pressure ulcers on a given day. What we found useful for the wound care nurse to do, was monthly pull up a list of all pressure ulcers that were documented and validate them. While doing this educating the staff nurse. After doing this for several months, when the quarterly prevalence was performed, there was markable improvement in documentation.

Original Post
September 7, 2009
Title: Documentation on Bedsores, comment

Having worked in the NICU for many years, we see several issues with skin breakdown. For the micro-preemies who are lacking the epidermis (or extremely thin epidermis)- it is especially hard to not have skin breakdown, anything that potentially touches their skin will cause breakdown. All of these babies are considered critically ill therefore require several EKG leads, pulse oximetry probes and other transcutaneous monitors. These monitors should be repositioned every couple of hours to minimize the damage and burns. Documenting and notifying the physician of skin breakdown is EXTREMELY important with these patients as they are at such high risk for infections.

Original Post
August 20, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

This is very true about the documentation of bed sores being incorrect. In the ICU where I work at, we actually document initially if there are any sores as soon as the patient arrives. It is located in the admission assessment. After that it is up to the nurses top document if there have been any changes in the skin integrity of the patient. Multiple time we see a skin assessment documented with a stage one/two pressure ulcer when reality is that it is incontinence associated dermatitis. Most time the IAD can resolved by either timely cleansing of the person, the insertion of a rectal tube and foley catheter (if not previously present) and some type of barrier ointment. In a way prevention is the best medicine for IAD and Pressure Ulcers, in companied with good core and forensic assessment skills. If the pt is having large loose stools, create a prevention to keep the skin intact.

Original Post
August 3, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

The hospital where I currently work also includes documentation of existing pressure ulcers on admission of a patient. However, the protocol asks you to assess the patient’s skin then to document on paper what the ulcer looks like, stage, size, drainage, etc. The paper charting does not require a picture of the pressure ulcer that was found by assessment of the RN. I think this leaves a wide margin for error. It is probable that some ulcers will not be documented correctly. I believe that a photo would be advantageous to the medical record along with perhaps a computerized charting system where you can label with an X any area of the body that has breakdown and then attach a photograph to the document. Also the documentation I work with does not allow for updates on how the pressure ulcer heals or worsens. This also leaves room for criticism and error. I think my place of work would benefit from photo/computerized documentation of pressure ulcers.

Original Post:
July 31, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

I found this post and other comments relative to my new nursing job. As an experienced ER nurse, we found little time to assess or document pressure ulcers. With the new CMS guidelines that came out this past October, Medicare will not longer be reimbursing for facility acquired pressure ulcers. My new nursing role focuses on prevention and education. I was very surprised how little I knew about pressure ulcers from working in the ED. Yet it is so vital that our assessment starts there. The photo proof documentation mentioned in this Post sounds like an excellent idea. One of the hospitals I work with, just installed a whole new soft ware program for nursing documentation. It is really easy to chart your skin assessments and pressure ulcers. With drop down choices, body diagrams. But the wound care nurse still has to validate the floor nurses documentation with her own patient assessment every month. I helped her with this, and it was very time consuming. It was double the work in my eyes. Yet we did find, many pressure ulcers that were resolved and many that were staged incorrectly, as well as several that were missed by the RN. Even though we have many different technologies to help us with our documentation and assessment, it still comes down to basic education.

Original Post:
June 17, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores
Joint Commission and CMS (Medicare) has set a Patient Safety Goal of not allowing bedsores to occur during hospitalizations. My institution uses technology to document existing wounds at the time of admission assessment. We are a totally computerized charting hospital. When we identify an existing wound, we bring up a screen of the body and insert a photo of the wound into the patient’s medical record. This feature allows us to prevent lawsuits and receive the correct reimbursement of that patient’s hospitalization. Health assessment no longer has to rely on a verbal or hand written dictation to describe history and physical assessments!

Tags: , , , ,

Documentation on Bedsores, comment (part 2)

September 15, 2009

When performing a skin assessment the obvious places to look for pressure ulcers are the sacrum, elbows, and heels. We can not forget to look in the unlikely places, such as the back of the head, ear lobes and around an ET tube. Doing many prevalence studies at numerous hospitals, I found many pressure ulcers that are missed or with improper documentation. I found that often fungal rashes, healed pressure ulcers, blanchable redness, and moisture related maceration are staged as a pressure ulcer. One hospital that recently changed to computer charting, has a system that can list all patients that were documented with pressure ulcers on a given day. What we found useful for the wound care nurse to do, was monthly pull up a list of all pressure ulcers that were documented and validate them. While doing this educating the staff nurse. After doing this for several months, when the quarterly prevalence was performed, there was markable improvement in documentation.

Original Post
September 7, 2009
Title: Documentation on Bedsores, comment

Having worked in the NICU for many years, we see several issues with skin breakdown. For the micro-preemies who are lacking the epidermis (or extremely thin epidermis)- it is especially hard to not have skin breakdown, anything that potentially touches their skin will cause breakdown. All of these babies are considered critically ill therefore require several EKG leads, pulse oximetry probes and other transcutaneous monitors. These monitors should be repositioned every couple of hours to minimize the damage and burns. Documenting and notifying the physician of skin breakdown is EXTREMELY important with these patients as they are at such high risk for infections.

Original Post
August 20, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

This is very true about the documentation of bed sores being incorrect. In the ICU where I work at, we actually document initially if there are any sores as soon as the patient arrives. It is located in the admission assessment. After that it is up to the nurses top document if there have been any changes in the skin integrity of the patient. Multiple time we see a skin assessment documented with a stage one/two pressure ulcer when reality is that it is incontinence associated dermatitis. Most time the IAD can resolved by either timely cleansing of the person, the insertion of a rectal tube and foley catheter (if not previously present) and some type of barrier ointment. In a way prevention is the best medicine for IAD and Pressure Ulcers, in companied with good core and forensic assessment skills. If the pt is having large loose stools, create a prevention to keep the skin intact.

Original Post
August 3, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

The hospital where I currently work also includes documentation of existing pressure ulcers on admission of a patient. However, the protocol asks you to assess the patient’s skin then to document on paper what the ulcer looks like, stage, size, drainage, etc. The paper charting does not require a picture of the pressure ulcer that was found by assessment of the RN. I think this leaves a wide margin for error. It is probable that some ulcers will not be documented correctly. I believe that a photo would be advantageous to the medical record along with perhaps a computerized charting system where you can label with an X any area of the body that has breakdown and then attach a photograph to the document. Also the documentation I work with does not allow for updates on how the pressure ulcer heals or worsens. This also leaves room for criticism and error. I think my place of work would benefit from photo/computerized documentation of pressure ulcers.

Original Post:
July 31, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

I found this post and other comments relative to my new nursing job. As an experienced ER nurse, we found little time to assess or document pressure ulcers. With the new CMS guidelines that came out this past October, Medicare will not longer be reimbursing for facility acquired pressure ulcers. My new nursing role focuses on prevention and education. I was very surprised how little I knew about pressure ulcers from working in the ED. Yet it is so vital that our assessment starts there. The photo proof documentation mentioned in this Post sounds like an excellent idea. One of the hospitals I work with, just installed a whole new soft ware program for nursing documentation. It is really easy to chart your skin assessments and pressure ulcers. With drop down choices, body diagrams. But the wound care nurse still has to validate the floor nurses documentation with her own patient assessment every month. I helped her with this, and it was very time consuming. It was double the work in my eyes. Yet we did find, many pressure ulcers that were resolved and many that were staged incorrectly, as well as several that were missed by the RN. Even though we have many different technologies to help us with our documentation and assessment, it still comes down to basic education.

Original Post:
June 17, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores
Joint Commission and CMS (Medicare) has set a Patient Safety Goal of not allowing bedsores to occur during hospitalizations. My institution uses technology to document existing wounds at the time of admission assessment. We are a totally computerized charting hospital. When we identify an existing wound, we bring up a screen of the body and insert a photo of the wound into the patient’s medical record. This feature allows us to prevent lawsuits and receive the correct reimbursement of that patient’s hospitalization. Health assessment no longer has to rely on a verbal or hand written dictation to describe history and physical assessments!

Tags: , , , ,

Documentation on Bedsores, comment

September 15, 2009

Since the new CMS guidelines came into effect, many hospitals have put into effect new policies and procedures around documentation. Focusing on skin assessments on admission, braden scores, consultations, physician and nurse documentation. Being an ER nurse we really found it difficult to understand the importance of pressure ulcer documentation on arrival. With being overwhelmed with so many critical patients, I found it hard to remember to do a skin assessment. If we were able to do photo documentation, it would help make such a difference. What a great tool to help the nurses and protect the hospitals! I hope someday my hospital will implement the same!

Original Post
September 7, 2009
Title: Documentation on Bedsores, comment

Having worked in the NICU for many years, we see several issues with skin breakdown. For the micro-preemies who are lacking the epidermis (or extremely thin epidermis)- it is especially hard to not have skin breakdown, anything that potentially touches their skin will cause breakdown. All of these babies are considered critically ill therefore require several EKG leads, pulse oximetry probes and other transcutaneous monitors. These monitors should be repositioned every couple of hours to minimize the damage and burns. Documenting and notifying the physician of skin breakdown is EXTREMELY important with these patients as they are at such high risk for infections.

Original Post
August 20, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

This is very true about the documentation of bed sores being incorrect. In the ICU where I work at, we actually document initially if there are any sores as soon as the patient arrives. It is located in the admission assessment. After that it is up to the nurses top document if there have been any changes in the skin integrity of the patient. Multiple time we see a skin assessment documented with a stage one/two pressure ulcer when reality is that it is incontinence associated dermatitis. Most time the IAD can resolved by either timely cleansing of the person, the insertion of a rectal tube and foley catheter (if not previously present) and some type of barrier ointment. In a way prevention is the best medicine for IAD and Pressure Ulcers, in companied with good core and forensic assessment skills. If the pt is having large loose stools, create a prevention to keep the skin intact.

Original Post
August 3, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

The hospital where I currently work also includes documentation of existing pressure ulcers on admission of a patient. However, the protocol asks you to assess the patient’s skin then to document on paper what the ulcer looks like, stage, size, drainage, etc. The paper charting does not require a picture of the pressure ulcer that was found by assessment of the RN. I think this leaves a wide margin for error. It is probable that some ulcers will not be documented correctly. I believe that a photo would be advantageous to the medical record along with perhaps a computerized charting system where you can label with an X any area of the body that has breakdown and then attach a photograph to the document. Also the documentation I work with does not allow for updates on how the pressure ulcer heals or worsens. This also leaves room for criticism and error. I think my place of work would benefit from photo/computerized documentation of pressure ulcers.

Original Post:
July 31, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

I found this post and other comments relative to my new nursing job. As an experienced ER nurse, we found little time to assess or document pressure ulcers. With the new CMS guidelines that came out this past October, Medicare will not longer be reimbursing for facility acquired pressure ulcers. My new nursing role focuses on prevention and education. I was very surprised how little I knew about pressure ulcers from working in the ED. Yet it is so vital that our assessment starts there. The photo proof documentation mentioned in this Post sounds like an excellent idea. One of the hospitals I work with, just installed a whole new soft ware program for nursing documentation. It is really easy to chart your skin assessments and pressure ulcers. With drop down choices, body diagrams. But the wound care nurse still has to validate the floor nurses documentation with her own patient assessment every month. I helped her with this, and it was very time consuming. It was double the work in my eyes. Yet we did find, many pressure ulcers that were resolved and many that were staged incorrectly, as well as several that were missed by the RN. Even though we have many different technologies to help us with our documentation and assessment, it still comes down to basic education.

Original Post:
June 17, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores
Joint Commission and CMS (Medicare) has set a Patient Safety Goal of not allowing bedsores to occur during hospitalizations. My institution uses technology to document existing wounds at the time of admission assessment. We are a totally computerized charting hospital. When we identify an existing wound, we bring up a screen of the body and insert a photo of the wound into the patient’s medical record. This feature allows us to prevent lawsuits and receive the correct reimbursement of that patient’s hospitalization. Health assessment no longer has to rely on a verbal or hand written dictation to describe history and physical assessments!

Tags: , , , ,

Documentation of Bedsores, comment

September 7, 2009

Having worked in the NICU for many years, we see several issues with skin breakdown. For the micro-preemies who are lacking the epidermis (or extremely thin epidermis)- it is especially hard to not have skin breakdown, anything that potentially touches their skin will cause breakdown. All of these babies are considered critically ill therefore require several EKG leads, pulse oximetry probes and other transcutaneous monitors. These monitors should be repositioned every couple of hours to minimize the damage and burns. Documenting and notifying the physician of skin breakdown is EXTREMELY important with these patients as they are at such high risk for infections.

Original Post
August 20, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

This is very true about the documentation of bed sores being incorrect. In the ICU where I work at, we actually document initially if there are any sores as soon as the patient arrives. It is located in the admission assessment. After that it is up to the nurses top document if there have been any changes in the skin integrity of the patient. Multiple time we see a skin assessment documented with a stage one/two pressure ulcer when reality is that it is incontinence associated dermatitis. Most time the IAD can resolved by either timely cleansing of the person, the insertion of a rectal tube and foley catheter (if not previously present) and some type of barrier ointment. In a way prevention is the best medicine for IAD and Pressure Ulcers, in companied with good core and forensic assessment skills. If the pt is having large loose stools, create a prevention to keep the skin intact.

Original Post
August 3, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

The hospital where I currently work also includes documentation of existing pressure ulcers on admission of a patient. However, the protocol asks you to assess the patient’s skin then to document on paper what the ulcer looks like, stage, size, drainage, etc. The paper charting does not require a picture of the pressure ulcer that was found by assessment of the RN. I think this leaves a wide margin for error. It is probable that some ulcers will not be documented correctly. I believe that a photo would be advantageous to the medical record along with perhaps a computerized charting system where you can label with an X any area of the body that has breakdown and then attach a photograph to the document. Also the documentation I work with does not allow for updates on how the pressure ulcer heals or worsens. This also leaves room for criticism and error. I think my place of work would benefit from photo/computerized documentation of pressure ulcers.

Original Post:
July 31, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores, comment

I found this post and other comments relative to my new nursing job. As an experienced ER nurse, we found little time to assess or document pressure ulcers. With the new CMS guidelines that came out this past October, Medicare will not longer be reimbursing for facility acquired pressure ulcers. My new nursing role focuses on prevention and education. I was very surprised how little I knew about pressure ulcers from working in the ED. Yet it is so vital that our assessment starts there. The photo proof documentation mentioned in this Post sounds like an excellent idea. One of the hospitals I work with, just installed a whole new soft ware program for nursing documentation. It is really easy to chart your skin assessments and pressure ulcers. With drop down choices, body diagrams. But the wound care nurse still has to validate the floor nurses documentation with her own patient assessment every month. I helped her with this, and it was very time consuming. It was double the work in my eyes. Yet we did find, many pressure ulcers that were resolved and many that were staged incorrectly, as well as several that were missed by the RN. Even though we have many different technologies to help us with our documentation and assessment, it still comes down to basic education.

Original Post:
June 17, 2009
Title: Documentation of Bedsores
Joint Commission and CMS (Medicare) has set a Patient Safety Goal of not allowing bedsores to occur during hospitalizations. My institution uses technology to document existing wounds at the time of admission assessment. We are a totally computerized charting hospital. When we identify an existing wound, we bring up a screen of the body and insert a photo of the wound into the patient’s medical record. This feature allows us to prevent lawsuits and receive the correct reimbursement of that patient’s hospitalization. Health assessment no longer has to rely on a verbal or hand written dictation to describe history and physical assessments!

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Health care informatics

September 7, 2009

Health care informatics applied to the Nursing process has been difficult for me to adjust to; from charting every detail to now entering data on a computer has been a challenge for me. I have met with a lot of frustrating moments from learning new computer programs to accepting the fact that a systematic data entry process of information is acceptable. The convergence of information technology with health care has enormous potential. Dramatic improvements in the quality and delivery of health care for patients and practitioners as a direct result of information technology are emerging and will play a significant long-term role in improving patient care as new technologies emerge.

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