Archive for May 17th, 2011

President Obama will not release public pictures of the dead Osama bin Laden, comment

May 17, 2011

The speed and outer boundries of healthcare informatics resources used in the case of Osama bin Laden has to be mind blowing!

I imagine that the USA armed service personnel had pictures and documentation stored on electronic devices to identify Osama bin Laden on the spot. These items had to include markings, scars, and maybe birthmarks. The same things we identify patients by in the hospital and other settings.

There also may have been a small portable lab setup present to quickly identify blood type. This does not identify a specific person. But it allows the personnel to quickly keep searching if the wrong blood type is shown. Again, this blood typing is used in the USA for quick close identification.

Telemedicine had to be in place also. It may or may not have been used during the raid. If the armed service personnel needed an answer or needed to send data, then Telemedicine or some form of it had to be quickly accessible.

I will let other healthcare informatics professionals discuss the aspect of rapid DNA analysis.

Original Post
May 11, 2011
President Obama will not release public pictures of the dead Osama bin Laden, comment
I wished I were part of the team that performed an autopsy on Osama bin Laden. There were more than the usual number of personnel for a single autopsy and/or there were several shortcuts to accomplish such an autopsy in a very short time. An autopsy will continue weeks, months, and sometimes years after a person is dissected and buried. Looking at television videos, I will guess that Osama bin Laden may have arthritis. This will show up in the forensic investigation of his death especially if it is chronic.

Original Post
May 5, 2011
President Obama will not release public pictures of the dead Osama bin Laden
Is President Barack Obama correct on this decision not to release disfigured photos of the dead Osama Bin Laden? Yes, he is.

The spirit of international and US laws prohibit the public release of photos of the deceased. Note that the US is unhappy when pictures of dead Americans are broadcasted publicly.

Morally speaking, most Americans would not want pictures of their disfigured passed away loved one broadcasted publicly. The moral, social and spiritual beliefs of a victim and family members should be taken into account. Also the moral, social, and spiritual belief of the country in possession of the pictures should be taken into account.

Ethically speaking, members of the Forensic Medical and Nursing profession are not permitted to show public pictures of the deceased. This brings me to another point. Forensic physicians, nurses, and personnel should be involved with the handling of Osama bin Laden and others. Forensic healthcare personnel are trained to be objective. They will confirm the cause of death, the time of death, the identification, and identify extra factors. The forensic healthcare personnel are removed from political and military biases. Their training includes caring for victims of war on both sides and innocent bystanders.

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Importance of Skin Assessment in Elderly and Child Abuse, comment

May 17, 2011

This is one area where healthcare informatics can be of great help. Instead of nurses trying to remember what to assess and what to write down, the health electronic record will indicate what assessment needs to be done and documented. If the nursing and hospital administration wants skin assessment done, they can include it in the program. And they can set the computer program to indicate to the nurse when this assessment should be done. Thus, the nurse does not have to guess in most circumstances.

Another part of the medical electronic record is the use of cameras. Some camera systems are able to insert an image of the skin assessment directly into the electronic chart. This is a huge time saver for of all nurses. No more writing essays on what was seen on the patients skin.

Original Post
October 18, 2010
Importance of Skin Assessment in Elderly and Child Abuse, comment
Skin assessment is a more valuable tool than we give it credit or time for. There are so many clues to a long list of health issues; from the varience in color, turgor, texture, temperature and thickness, to hair distribution, and condition of the nails. All of these variances from norm could be linked to some health issue. Issues like nutritional deficiency, allergy, local or systemic disease; such as melanoma or systemic lupus erythematosus; or they could be signs or the ‘remnants’ of abuse.

Unfortunately, I don’t think the nurse on the floor routinely gives skin assessment the time or attention needed to pick up on these clues. The most opportune time to find these signs would be on admission, during the initial assessment. What I see on the floor, is short staffing more often than not, trying to care for more patients than can be fully cared for during their shift, and bed shortages, requiring ’quick’ turnover. I am also afraid that the gains in my staffing numbers over the past year are in jeopardy with the reforms and cuts in reimbursement that I think are coming. Thorough assessments are an essential part of health care, of preventative medicine, and all of our professional practices; so I truly hope there will be the time and ability going forward to complete this valuable task.

Original Post

May 26, 2009

Title: Importance of Skin Assessment in Elderly and Child Abuse

In studying skin assessment, one cannot help feeling overwhelmed. Without a desire to pursue dermatology, the unlimited amount of skin lesions, pustules, macules and papules can lead one to skim over information out of the pure necessity for mental sanity. The mind can only hold so many pictures at once. However, I do see the need to ensure the memorization and ability to recognize and diagnose normal skin variations. In reading articles and working with children and the elderly, one unfortunately sees the reality firsthand of physical abuse and neglect. This can often be recognized by assessing the skin. Breakdown, malnutrition, physical abuse, bruises, injuries at different stages of healing can all be noted by a thorogh assessment of the skin. As follow up care and the big picture should always be a part of our thought process in nursing assessment, the ability to note whether a skin assessment finding is simply normal or abnormal is vital to our practice.

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